Fryklos (Fearless) #2 A Self Fulfilling Prophecy?

Have you ever wondered if makers have favourite creations in their portfolios?

Whilst I can’t answer for anyone else, the answer for me is yes!

It might change from time to time, but right now my absolute favourite is also the rug I’m most proud of. Fryklos.

PHOTO: YESHEN VENEMA
PHOTO: YESHAN VENEMA

Fryktlos (Fearless)/#2/Cream was handwoven in my Bristol Studio in the summer of 2016, in preparation for Decorex International. It’s partner, (Fryklos #1/Grey) now resides in a luxury apartment near Salfords Media City, and a huge part of me is really happy to still have this rug in my life. (Yeah, pretty poor business skills there, I agree!)

So, what makes this rug stand out from all the other things I’ve woven at this point in my life?

Firstly, it’s symbolic name. I frequently use a Scandinavian rug weaving technique called Krokbragd, so I translated the names of this entire collection into Norwegian. (They were originally created for the colourCoded exhibition at Devon Guild of Craftsmen and I added cream version later the same year).

Having a piece named fearless is proving to be a self fulfilling prophecy for my practice generally. I’m certainly taking braver steps that I would’ve imagined a few years ago.

PHOTO: YESHEN VENEMA

 

PHOTO: YESHEN VENEMA

The main reason for my pride in this rug, however, is in what it accomplished technically. As anyone who weaves Krokbragd will tell you, the underside edges can often look less than satisfactory. It’s just one of the drawbacks of creating such and mixture of colour and pattern on the right side, and you basically have to accept it. With the patterns and shuttle sequencing for this piece however, I really got the edging I’d been trying to achieve for ages.

 

PHOTO:AP

 

Also, a sure sign of a good quality handwoven rug is the straightness and neatness of the selvedge. (Ok, smug selvedge photo alert, but after years of practice plus some expert guidance I’m allowing myself to feel pleased with these edges).

 

PHOTO:AP

 

Reflecting on this rug has me thinking about the attachment a maker has with the work they’ve often invested hours, weeks and sometimes months in, and the mixed bag of emotions involved in marketing and selling them-Another reason why our small businesses are so very different to typical commercial ventures and why buying hand crafted is much more than buying the end product.

Experience has taught me that at this stage I can’t predict how long it will take to sell a handwoven rug like this.

Photo: The Forge

 

Some take 2 weeks, some 2 months and others 2 years. What I can predict, however, is the mixed feeling I’ll have when this one leaves *home*. (Though I’m sure delight will supersede mourning!)

 

Photo: The Forge

 

This rug will be one of the items for sale on my new on-line shop at www.angieparkertextiles.com – Coming soon.

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